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The Future of the Metro Data Centre Interconnect


View this webinar here at Upskill University.

Synopsis:
Web-scale players and the emergence of cloud networking are changing the communications landscape dramatically and providing tremendous new growth opportunities in optical networking. On the one hand, web 2.0 giants, such as Google, Facebook and Yahoo, are becoming large buyers of DWDM equipment as they connect their massive data centres across cities and countries. On the other hand, traditional telcos are pursuing their own strategy, increasingly outsourcing data centres and creating a connected intelligent-edge strategy that pushes content and data closer to the customers and still requires high-speed optics. This course looks at the future of metro data centre interconnect, primarily from the telcos’ perspective. What lessons can be learned from the web-scale service providers? What should telecom operators do differently to put data, content and network smarts where they are needed most?

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